About the North Loop

History of the North Loop

The North Loop name once referred to the trolley line that served the area. Today it defines the shape of the neighborhood and its location adjacent to Downtown Minneapolis. The neighborhood is located in the Minneapolis Warehouse Historic District, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. For most of its history, the North Loop was an industrial area, and home to a large railroad yard and numerous warehouses and factories. The Warehouse District fell into disrepair in the 1960s and 70s, but reemerged in the 1980s as the epicenter of the Minneapolis art scene. In recent years, revitalization of the North Loop has accelerated, with the neighborhood becoming “the” Twin Cities neighborhood in which to live, work, eat, shop and play.

The warehouses that characterize the district are mostly six to eight stories high, and about 62 structures on seven square blocks contribute to the district. The predominant form of design is the Chicago Commercial style, but many other styles were built, including Italianate, Queen Anne style, Richardsonian Romanesque, Classical Revival, and early 20th century commercial styles. The warehouse district was in turn associated with the railroad transportation network that was under development at the time, which connected Minneapolis with the rest of the Midwest and the rest of the country. These warehouses were used for wholesale and storage of goods related to milling and manufacturing. The nomination for the National Register of Historic Places states that the district, as a whole, comprises a cohesive district of buildings with a common physical appearance, as well as a common age and original use.

Duffy Paper Company, North Loop Neighborhood Minneapolis, MN

A Part of the Historic Minneapolis Warehouse District

The warehouses that characterize the district are mostly six to eight stories high, and about 62 structures on seven square blocks contribute to the district. The predominant form of design is the Chicago Commercial style, but many other styles were built, including Italianate, Queen Anne style, Richardsonian Romanesque, Classical Revival, and early 20th century commercial styles. The warehouse district was in turn associated with the railroad transportation network that was under development at the time, which connected Minneapolis with the rest of the Midwest and the rest of the country. These warehouses were used for wholesale and storage of goods related to milling and manufacturing. The nomination for the National Register of Historic Places states that the district, as a whole, comprises a cohesive district of buildings with a common physical appearance, as well as a common age and original use.

Minnesota Compass North Loop Neighborhood Profile

Facts

  • The North Loop is the fastest-growing neighborhood in Minneapolis, growing from 1,500 residents in 2000 tripling to 4,300 in 2010… and increasing rapidly!
  • The largest age groups were 25-34 (37%), 35-44 (17%), 45-54 (13%) and 55-64 (9%).
  • In 2010, the neighborhood had about 2,200 households. Children under 18 years were in about 5% of these households (116 households). People over age 65 were in 5% of the neighborhood’s households.
  • Owner-occupied housing units were 51% of the North Loop neighborhood in 2010; rental housing was 49%.
  • In 2010, approximately 9,500 jobs were located in the neighborhood, a number increasing rapidly.
  • The neighborhood includes Target Field, home of the Minnesota Twins.
  • The Minneapolis Farmers Market, an institution since 1937, adds to the neighborhood vibrancy, and attracts people from across the Twin Cities.
  • The neighborhood continues to gain accolades from local and national publications, as “Best Neighborhood” (Mpls/St. Paul Magazine and CityPages), 12th Hippest Neighborhood (Forbes), “Favorite Neighborhood” (Fast Company), “Coolist Neighborhood in American” (Thrillist), and “Go List 2016” (Fodor’s).
  • Rated best biking city by Bike Score, and #3 bicycling city by Bicycling Magazine.
  • Target Field Station serves as a central, multi-modal transportation hub, serving the METRO Blue and Green lines and Northstar Commuter Rail. The adjacent public plaza and amphitheater is a community gathering spot and host to year-round special events.
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